EDC448 Daily Assignments Spring 2015


From here, you can access an electronic version of your readings or activity sheets for our class assignments.

Day 1: (Thursday, Jan 22) Introductions
IN CLASS
FOR HOMEWORK
EDC448 World Cafe - Post your reflections on this Google Docs public page

View responses from SP2013 and SP2014 - any changes?



Day 2: (Thursday, Jan 29) SEMINAR How good readers think?


IN CLASS (Powerpoint from Today)


›GETTING TO KNOW YOU: Share an artifact that represents you or something important in your life. Think of ways to build on the ideas of those who shared before you.

›GETTING STARTED: Share a short sentence/section from your reading that really makes you think and explain why. As you contribute to the conversation, think of ways to build on the ideas of those who shared before you.
HOMEWORK (DUE FEB 3):


Day 3: (Tuesday, Feb. 3) WORKSHOP How do good readers make sense of challenging text?

IN CLASS
FOR HOMEWORK (DUE Feb 5)
What role does questioning & wondering play in helping readers make sense of challenging text?


WORKSHOP A: Slideshow Talking Points

Tovani's (2004) Wondering
(CLASS PADLET - http://goo.gl/kOWZSQ

Ciardello's (2003) Question-Finding
CLASS PADLET - http://goo.gl/4ca434

Other ideas to explore later:
Tony Wagner (VIDEOS): Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World



WORKSHOP B: The Watchdog and the Thief (Practicing Close Reading and Wondering)


TO PREPARE FOR SEMINAR:

TO PREPARE FOR TEACHING THINKING STRATEGIES (DUE BY FEB 10)
  • Complete Comprehension Strategy Self-Assessment Assignment: If you'd prefer to type your comments/reflections into the chart, you can download a digital version of the assignment here



Day 4: (Thursday, Feb. 5) SEMINAR: Why do we need advanced literacy instruction?


IN CLASS
FOR HOMEWORK (DUE FEB 10)
Seminar: Why do we need advanced literacy instruction? Who should teach it?

GETTING STARTED:
›What “good reader strategies” do you routinely practice as a college student when you read challenging texts in your discipline? Give an example of how this helps you actively make sense of what you read. Which strategy could you use more regularly and how/why might that help? As you contribute to the conversation, think of ways to build on the ideas of those who shared before you.

›CONTINUING THE CONVERSATION:
›Shanahan & Shanahan (2008) define disciplinary literacy as the ways that experts in a certain discipline create, disseminate, and evaluate knowledge. Use your journal notes and seminar questions (see file) to guide your discussion.


  • Complete Comprehension Strategy Self-Assessment Assignment (see download from Feb. 3)

Preparing for Faculty Meeting on Trends in Adolescent Literacy
  • Reports on Adolescent Literacy: click here to (a) view the video, (b) download your selected reading for the Jigsaw Activity, and (c) download a digital version of the advanced organizer you will prepare and copy as a handout for your group members.




Day 6: (Tuesday, Feb. 10) What Does the Research Say? Adolescent Literacy: Current Trends and Challenges


CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK (Due Feb. 12)
  • Participate in Faculty Meeting Jigsaw Groups to Discuss Adolescent Literacy Reports

SUMMARY OF 5 RECOMMENDED INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES OF ALL CONTENT AREA TEACHERS
GROUP A
  • no size fits all - use different teaching strategies
  • make content relevant and interesting
  • be well educated on how to teach literacy
  • continue literacy education throughout career
  • provide modeling
  • foster parental involvement
  • engage in shared reading and group work
GROUP B
  • encourage oral conversation/discussion
  • use students' personal interests
  • promote a variety of texts (comics, Internet, etc.)
  • never stop teaching HOW to read or teach new strategies
  • model individual strategies
GROUP C
  • coordinate vocabulary with content instruction
  • base curricular choices on process instead of strictly content
  • provide for students' needs
  • make sure professional development is targeted and problem specific
GROUP D
  • model what you are thinking
  • make sure teachers have access to tools and training necessary to teach literacy
  • foster student motivation and engagement
  • provide individualized instruction
  • provide explicit vocabulary instruction




Day 7: (Feb. 12) Diverse Readers and Practicum Information

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK (Due Feb. 17)
Informational Meeting about expectations for EDC 332: Practicum

Dr. Jay Fogleman
  • Prepare for Seminar: Making Thinking Visible in the following ways:
    • Read: Tovani Ch. 2 (Textbook): The “So What?” of Reading Comprehension
    • Read: Beuhl p. 210 Text Coding (Textbook) and watch this 2 minute video to see what this looks like in practice:
    • Apply Text Coding as you read: Cognitive Apprenticeship: Making Thinking Visible
      • Here's the Cognitive Apprenticeship article - Bring your marked up "coded" copy of this article to class with you to help you participate in our seminar
        • If you print it out, you can mark it up by hand.
        • If you read it digitally, you can mark it up with the annotation tools in Adobe Acrobat. Download here (for free) and view the 4-minute tutorial to show you how to highlight, add text, or add "stickynote comments" (with the comment bubble). Bring your computer with you to our class seminar if you mark up your text digitally.
      • Here's a copy of the bookmark in case you'd like to use this with students you work with (highlight/underline idea in the text, add code and comment to the margin or on a sticky)

Day 8: (Feb. 17 - Tuesday) Making Disciplinary Thinking Visible

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Seminar: Making Disciplinary Thinking Visible



GETTING STARTED:
  • Share an idea that you coded as either “I” (inferencing) or “!” (something that particularly intrigued you) about the concept of cognitive apprenticeship.

CONTINUING THE CONVERSATION

  • Cognitive Apprenticeship [content]
  • Coding the Text with Thinking Notes [process]

Teaching Student Annotation

Tackling the Text Assignment (Download template below, and see Tackling the Text Think-Aloud Assignment Page for more information).
  • Please note: This is now due next Thursday, Feb. 26, but a rough draft with preliminary ideas is due in class next Tuesday, Feb. 24 to share in a small group workshop.

Prepare for a seminar on Thursday about Developing Disciplinary Reading Identities

1. Jot down a few notes from your 2/12 reading about Reading Identity (Beuhl A, p. 1-16) (download Response Journal below)

2. Read/view the following about modeling and capturing how to think effectively:
  • Read: Tovani Ch. 6: Holding Thinking to Remember & Reuse (modeling ways to do a close reading of text)
  • View Think-Aloud Videos for examples in Science, History, and/or English Language Arts (Choose at least two)
  • Read: Beuhl A (p. 174-214: Questioning & Frontloading (Review Questioning the Author and Self-Questioning Taxonomy) and then read pages relevant to think-alouds in your discipline): History (188-192); Literary (192-198); Science (198-203); Math (203-208); Technical and Music (208-213).
  • Complete two column response journal for the readings and video viewings

3. Bring your notes about reading identity and your two column journal about thinking and be prepared to discuss issues how to develop your students identities as learners/thinkers in your discipline.

Day 9 February 19 - Thursday: Developing Disciplinary Reading Identities


CLASSWORK - SEMINAR
HOMEWORK
Seminar: Your Role in Developing Your Students' Disciplinary Reading Identities

Activity: Disciplinary Challenges Worth Modeling
1. SKIM FOR THINK-ALOUD IDEAS: Lapp, Fisher, & Grant (You can read this text: I’ll Show You How) for additional think-aloud ideas and format


2. SKIM FOR ADDITIONAL IDEAS: Coiro (2011). Talking about reading as thinking, Modeling the complexities of online reading comprehension. [Another example of the two-column format for providing commentary and linking to metacognitive strategies)


2. Select/read a passage of challenging text for your "Tackling the Text Think-Aloud assignment" and bring to class on Tuesday Feb. 24 with some thinking notes in the margins about locations/ideas in the text that are likely to make it challenging to understand. This will get you started on the actual think-aloud assignment that is due Thursday Feb. 26. We'll talk more in class about this next Tuesday to make sure things are clear.
Download assignment here:





Day 10 February 24 - Tuesday: Close Reading, Marking Up The Text, & Thinking-Aloud

CLASSWORK - WORKSHOP
HOMEWORK
Thinking Aloud:
Teaching the Declaration of Independence: History Lesson from the Teaching Channel (WHAT DO YOU NOTICE??)

Powerpoint Slides


Think Aloud Samples (shared in class)



Share examples of think-alouds while marking up a text.

OPTIONAL RESOURCES:
1. READ: Brown (2007): I'll Have Mine Annotated Please - Helping Students Make Connections with Texts.

Consider overlaps between ideas for modeling how to annotate text and thinking aloud as an expert in your discipline - to inform your completion of your think-aloud assignment (and your marking up of your text)


2. FINISH: Tackling the Text Think-Aloud Script/Digital Video for at least two locations in your text. Follow the directions and use resources available at the Tackling the Text Think-Aloud Assignment Page.

This is due next class (Thursday, Feb. 26)
  • Be prepared to teach your think-aloud lesson with a small group of your peers.
  • Hand in hard copy of your lesson AND your marked up/annotated text
  • If you make a digital version, be sure to explain purpose, objectives, standards, and strategies at the beginning of your think-aloud
  • Preview scoring rubric for Think-Aloud Assignment to understand expectations:




DAY 11: (Feb. 26 WORKSHOP) Thinking Aloud About Challenging Texts

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Workshop:
  • Practice modeling a mini-think-aloud lesson with your students
  • Practice reflecting on your own teaching practices and your peers’ practices
  • Reflect as a whole group on both the process and product of your think-alouds

Introduction to Common Core Standards and Text Complexity


Pass Out ELL Interview Task (Due by March 24)

Prepare for Seminar on Text Complexity and Rigorous Texts

1.LISTEN: Text Complexity CCSS Video
2.READ:Beuhl A Textbook, Ch. 2 (p. 37-71) The Nature of Complex Texts (generally and in each discipline)
3. READ:


Day 11: (March 3 WORKSHOP) Understanding Rigor in Reading: Text Complexity and Accessible Text

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
1. LARGE GROUP DISCUSSION of Issues Surrounding Text Complexity:
What makes text hard? How does one determine the readability of text?

Powerpoint Slideshow:


Readability:

Diane Ravitch's blog post, titled Why Most Students Will Fail PARCC Test

2. DISCUSSION: Small-group, then large group
Central Claim: Students should read challenging (complex) texts in their content area on a regular basis.
1. READ: Qualitative Measures of Text Complexity (Fisher & Frey, Chapter 3)



2. READ: Beuhl A: Chapter 3 (Teaching to the Match: Bridging Academic Knowledge Gaps p. 72-92 especially chart on page 86* and your disciplinary section between p. 92-119)

3. READ: Tovani, Ch. 4: Real Rigor: Connecting Students with Accessible Text


4. Complete Discussion Web & Final Response -
PLEASE DOWNLOAD, TYPE, AND HAND IN NEXT CLASS


5. OPTIONAL SOURCE: Simplifying Text Complexity Video



DAY 12: March 5 (CANCELLED DUE TO SNOW)


DAY 12: (March 10 Workshop/Discussion)

QUALITATIVE MEASURES OF TEXT COMPLEXITY - ACCESSIBILITY VS. RIGOR


CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK

  • Part 2 Discussion: Does accessible text have to sacrifice rigor? Why or why not?
READ: Beuhl A: Ch. 4 Frontloading Instruction to Activate and Build Academic Knowledge (Come prepared to apply this knowledge in class on March 10)

Complete Essay on Rigor and Accessibility (download directions here). Due March 12 - be sure to attach completed Discussion Web 1 and Discussion Web 2 handouts from homework on Feb. 26 and March 3



Preview Diverse Text Set Assignment (download file) and start thinking about your topic (The text set is due March 26) - Explore archives from previous semesters to see what has been covered).



(March 12) Workshop on Getting Their Attention: Setting a Purpose and Backwards Design


CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Class Slideshow
(Setting a Purpose and Backwards Design)

1. Purpose is Everything! The House

2. BACKWARDS DESIGN:
Think about key concepts of backward design and how you will apply these in your lesson. COMPLETE this backward design worksheet and bring to your lesson plan meeting with Dr. Coiro.


3. Your EDC448 Lesson Plan Assignment (See more details here)
These readings/activities are designed to spark your thinking about how to get student's attention (or "hook them") at the beginning of your lesson. They can also offer ideas for frontloading, as you read about in Beuhl's chapter for homework last class.

  • READ: Tovani, Chapter 5 (Why Am I Reading This?)
  • READ: Beuhl (your textbook): Activating Prior Knowledge (p. 45, 70, 82, 107, 162) - How to use anticipation guides, connect two, story impressions, and K-W-L PLUS activities
  • EXPLORE and RR#8: Interactive Websites in your content area to think more about how these websites might play a role in hooking students and/or activating their prior knowledge. Before class after Spring break on March 24, please post your comments and ideas in this Google Docs Table in the cells corresponding to your discipline.

Be prepared to participate in a seminar on March 24 about your readings from Beuhl A, Ch. 4 (Frontloading); Buehl B (Activating Prior Knowledge activities) and your reactions to the Interactive Websites

UPCOMING ASSIGNMENTS:



Tuesday March 24 Getting Their Attention

(Frontloading Activities to Activate, Assess, and Build Pre-requisite Knowledge of Your Content)

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Slideshow:

ACTIVITY 1: Instructional Strategies for Supporting Comprehension

ACTIVITY 2: APA Format for Citing Sources

SEMINAR. Prior knowledge plays a large role in reading comprehension. Read more.
  • How will you determine how much knowledge your students bring to your lesson?
  • How will you explicitly activate that knowledge to help students connect it to new information?
  • What will you do if you realize students have little to no "assumed
    knowledge” of the content in your lesson?
  • What role can digital/interactive texts play in building or activating requisite knowledge?
1. Finish Diverse Text Set and upload to the Wikispace using the link to your name

2. Read 6 pages to prepare for Thursdays Workshop:
Buehl B: Concept/Definition Mapping (83-86);
Student Friendly Explanations (206-209)


Thursday March 26 Using Backward Design and Assessment Products to Guide Lesson Design

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Class Slideshow:
Linking Backward Design To Lesson Plan Elements; (Standards, Objectives, Curriculum, and Rubrics)



Discuss how to clarify assignment tasks (and rubrics) to improve the quality of student work

Additional Resources for Formative Assessments
Complete the following to prepare for class seminar **

Tuesday March 31: Building Academic Vocabulary with Bricks and Mortar

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Building Academic Language Slides


Handouts for Tier 1, 2, and 3 words and Concept/Definition Map


Overview of the CCSS Initiatives for English Language Learners

READ, EXPLORE, REACT

Thursday April 2: Addressing the Needs of English Language Learners

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Seminar: Addressing the Needs of English Language Learners



Enjoy Easter (if you celebrate).
Please work on your lesson plans - they are due next Thursday, April 9

To gain additional ideas about assessing learning, read:

Tuesday April 7 Linking Assessment and Standards to Evidence of Learning

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Class Slideshow:

FINISH YOUR LESSON PLAN ASSIGNMENT
Remember to include all pieces and attach the cover sheet checklist

Text Readings that might spark some ideas:
  • Beuhl A: Ch. 6 (p. 216-240): Instructional Practices to help students rehearse, organize, and elaborate on content
  • Beuhl B (56, 87, 106, 118, 158, 221) - see your syllabus for labels of each activity

Thursday April 9 Graphic Organizers

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Class Slideshow:



Graphic Organizers in Math

Other examples of graphic organizers in math

Explain final assignment: Poster Presentation
Locate A Theory Into Practice Article in Your Discipline and Draft An Abstract (Due April 14)

1. Explore the library database. Download the file for directions (p. 1), journal ideas (p. 2) and details for the typed proposal abstract (p. 3).


Bring to class your typed proposal abstract and hard copy of the article (for me to keep) so I can approve it before next steps.

2. Read this short blog post by Dr. Coiro about Teaching Adolescents How To Evaluate the Quality of Online Information. Be prepared for a discussion and activity about evaluating online sources.


Tuesday April 14 Evaluating Online Sources

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
1. Checks for Theory Into Practice article and abstract drafts

2. Dates for Teaching Lesson Plan

3. Critical Evaluation Findings

4. RESOURCE FOR YOU: Quicksheets for Activity Ideas and Active Verbs Aligned with elements of Bloom's Taxonomy


5. FOOD FOR THOUGHT:
"Why the widespread belief in learning styles is not just wrong; it's also dangerous" (article and TED Talk)
1. NO CLASS ON THURSDAY

2. Prepare for Lesson Plan (make any updates for revisions; prepare materials for your "student group" including think-aloud and student graphic organizers to support/engage them with your content)

3. Work on Theory Into Practice poster preparation (single page handout and visual) - see student example below for guidance:

Example of abstract from last year:
POSTER #5. Engaging Young Intellectuals: Identifying With US History in a Diverse Classroom
One of the most challenging aspects/themes of literacy comprehension that we’ve continuously discussed in this course is differentiated instruction. In other words, what can we as teachers do to provide the right growing tools for students on different learning levels in our classrooms? There’s no such thing as a classroom where all students think, read, speak, write and learn at the same level. Making our lessons accessible for higher level learners is especially difficult with respect to this sort of diversity in learning. It isn't easy to prepare for these variances that we will encounter in our lesson plans. It is our job as teachers to be ready for these challenges through effective differentiated instruction. A vital element for secondary social studies teachers is to utilize teaching strategies that provide an enriching experience in US history classrooms that will engage intellectually gifted learners. Maintaining these aspects in our teaching becomes especially challenging in culturally diverse classrooms where the students may not have been born in the United States and the content may seem less easy to identify with. This presentation will explore models for delivering a framework for delivering a culturally responsive curriculum for diverse and gifted level students within the content area of US history.


Thursday April 16 NO CLASS - Work on Lesson Plan and Poster Session Project


Groupings for Lesson Plan Demonstrations
Screen Shot 2015-04-14 at 1.09.07 PM.png


April 21, 2015: Lesson Plan Demonstrations Part 1

  • Homework:external image c.gif
    • Finish assignment revisions
    • Those who taught lessons today, your reflection is due on Thursday April 23. Download reflection template here:

      Then type your responses, print, staple your peer reviews to your reflection, and hand in a hard copy on Thursday. If you made revisions to your lesson plan assignment, please attach your reflection to your revised lesson plan. Please be sure to include your original lesson plan with my comments along with your revision.
    • Work on poster presentations and prepare/upload 1 page handout to the 2015 conference wikispace no later than Monday April 28. I will talk more about the handout in class on Thursday.


April 23, 2015: Lesson Plan Demonstrations Part 2

  • Homework:
    • Finish poster presentations and prepare/upload 1 page handout to the 2015 conference wikispace no later than Monday April 28 at 3PM so Dr. Coiro can prepare handouts of the conference schedule for class
    • Complete Post-Survey for the class (8 points added to reading reflection grade) by April 28 - use your assigned number (download file below to get your number)
    • Finish any requests for assignment revisions


April 28, 2015: Theory Into Practice Conference - Poster Presentations


INFORMATION BEYOND HERE STILL NEEDS TO BE UPDATED


Using Assessments to Guide Learning (Part 2)

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Class Slideshow:

APA Formatting
DUE NO LATER THAN THURSDAY APRIL 17 (I would prefer Tuesday, April 15)

Select an article and write your proposal for the Theory Into Practice Assignment - if your library card has been scanned at the library, you should be able to access the online journal database from anywhere (including your home) to search the journals. Explore the library database. Download the file for directions (p. 1), journal ideas (p. 2) and details for the typed proposal abstract (p. 3).
Bring to class your typed abstract and hard copy of the article (for me to keep) so I can approve it before next steps.

  • Example of Dr. Coiro's Poster Presentation at the International Reading Association (includes poster embedded with QR Codes and handout)
  • Example of abstract from last year:
    POSTER #5. Engaging Young Intellectuals: Identifying With US History in a Diverse Classroom
    One of the most challenging aspects/themes of literacy comprehension that we’ve continuously discussed in this course is differentiated instruction. In other words, what can we as teachers do to provide the right growing tools for students on different learning levels in our classrooms? There’s no such thing as a classroom where all students think, read, speak, write and learn at the same level. Making our lessons accessible for higher level learners is especially difficult with respect to this sort of diversity in learning. It isn't easy to prepare for these variances that we will encounter in our lesson plans. It is our job as teachers to be ready for these challenges through effective differentiated instruction. A vital element for secondary social studies teachers is to utilize teaching strategies that provide an enriching experience in US history classrooms that will engage intellectually gifted learners. Maintaining these aspects in our teaching becomes especially challenging in culturally diverse classrooms where the students may not have been born in the United States and the content may seem less easy to identify with. This presentation will explore models for delivering a framework for delivering a culturally responsive curriculum for diverse and gifted level students within the content area of US history.

Designing Assignments to Foster Learning and Success



Exploring Student Generated Visual Representations of Key Concepts









Lawrence, White & Snow (2010) The Words Students Need. Educational Leadership. Read article online.
  • You might enjoy the embedded links to the Academic Word List, VisuWord Online Graphical Dictionary, and the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (for student friendly definitions).


Feedback from Argumentation Essays



OTHER PLANS TO FIT IN

COMMON CORE STANDARDS LESSON
HOMEWORK
CLASSWORK
Common Core Documents and PARCC Task Prototypes
Discussion of Key Points

1. Class Powerpoint

2. RIDE summary of Instructional Shifts in Reading and Math

3. PARCC Assessment Item and Task Protoypes
4. Math Common Core Item Prototypes

  • Language Arts/History Folks: See p. 61, Grades 11-12 for History Standards; p. 39 for Reading Info Texts, and p. 64 for Writing Standards
  • Math/Science Folks (for both sets of tasks: See p. 62 for Reading Standards and p. 64 for Writing Standards

4. Literacy Design Collaborative "template tasks" and sample modules

  • CCSS: New York delays assessments until 2022 while working toward meeting the standards and preparing teachers!
  • Participate in Workshop to Complete CCSS Alignment to CCSS Test Items while considering how to make your own thinking visible to complete these items. Here's the new Math Task (3 items):

March 31 Building/Supporting Critical Thinking from Multiple Perspectives

CLASSWORK
HOMEWORK
Workshop:
SLIDESHOW for Argumentation Format:


1. Scaffolding the Reading and Writing of Argumentation Texts
2. Linking Instruction in Academic Vocabulary and Questioning
Read: Beuhl A, Ch. 6 Instructional Practices for Working Complex Texts
  • Rehearsing
  • Elaborating
  • Organizing

Complete a two column journal with these readings
(reflections, connections, interpretations, and questions).
Consider one technique in each section that might be
useful in supporting student's rehearsal, elaboration, and
organization of content you plan to cover in your lesson plan assignment.
Bring your journal sheet and your ideas to a workshop on Thursday.